hanlsp said: How do you pronounce "perilunesky"? My first guess was something close to Perry Luneski (, Hard Boiled Detective).

perilunesky:

And wow, I just realized I’ve been thinking it in French (in my head) this whole time. Well, the perilune part anyway. Sky I think in English. So, in ENGLISH, this is how it’s said.

Phonetics would work out to “pehri-loon” roughly, though any of our editors/VO folk can correct me on this.

I do pronounce the word sky as in actual atmosphere area above our heads, as perilune means “the point at which a spacecraft in lunar orbit is closest to the moon” and thus, sky. Because they’re all up thattaway. :D 

 

On the other hand, Perri Luneski (Hard Boiled Detective) would be an awesome show and I would watch it.

Perri Luneski liked three things: kicking ass, justice and her mom.

Also perogis.

Four things.

@1 hour ago with 2 notes
darlingjustbehuman:

I need this for my own safety.

For scenicartdepository

darlingjustbehuman:

I need this for my own safety.

For scenicartdepository

(Source: princusbeau, via knitmeapony)

@22 hours ago with 61144 notes
cracked:

Look — we don’t want to give the wrong impression here. Michael Brown could have burned down that store and still wouldn’t deserve to be shot if he wasn’t threatening the life of the cop. BUT…
4 Facts About Ferguson the Media Keeps Screwing Up

#4. There Is Zero Doubt That Michael Brown Stole Cigars (Not That It Matters)
As the story later clarifies, the officer (who was aware of the previous robbery) saw Brown walking with the same cigars that had been stolen and suspected that he was the shoplifter. And why is this so important? It isn’t, which is why it’s so important. Focusing on whether or not Michael Brown stole cigars as a big factor in the story implies that the police response was somehow way more forgivable if the kid who was shot six fucking times in the street lifted $50 in smokables.

Read More

cracked:

Look — we don’t want to give the wrong impression here. Michael Brown could have burned down that store and still wouldn’t deserve to be shot if he wasn’t threatening the life of the cop. BUT…

4 Facts About Ferguson the Media Keeps Screwing Up

#4. There Is Zero Doubt That Michael Brown Stole Cigars (Not That It Matters)

As the story later clarifies, the officer (who was aware of the previous robbery) saw Brown walking with the same cigars that had been stolen and suspected that he was the shoplifter. And why is this so important? It isn’t, which is why it’s so important. Focusing on whether or not Michael Brown stole cigars as a big factor in the story implies that the police response was somehow way more forgivable if the kid who was shot six fucking times in the street lifted $50 in smokables.

Read More

(via knitmeapony)

@23 hours ago with 799 notes
#ferguson 

Anonymous said: i was wondering how you felt about all the dudebros claiming that BW is alienating their fanbase by including LGBT characters?

perilunesky:

dgaider:

Which fanbase? The “dudebro fanbase”? Is that a thing? If someone comes to us and says, “you’re alienating those of your fans who expect to be catered to exclusively,” I have to say it’s a bit hard to feel bad about it. It’s not as if they don’t have other choices out there, after all, if it means that much to them. Certainly there are plenty of guys who don’t expect that, despite the willingness of these few to speak on their behalf.

Other thoughts that come to mind:

1) BioWare has been doing this for some time. If one was actually alienated by the inclusion of LGBT content, I think they’d know by now and have moved on.

2) It’s pretty clear that what bothers some of these gentlemen is not that there is a group of players being “catered” or “pandered” to—but that anyone other than them is receiving said catering and pandering. The mere idea that there is even some content included which was made without them in mind and without consulting their opinion is evidently insulting. Perhaps they can ask for advice on how to come to grips with that notion from fans who experience that elsewhere as a matter of course?

3) They talk about and think about this content way more than BioWare ever could, especially compared to how much of it is actually in the game. Maybe once they play, they’ll see that there’s plenty of other game for them to enjoy… unless they go specifically looking for stuff they don’t enjoy, which I guess they might. Some people are masochistic that way, I suppose.

I kinda love reblogging David’s posts. 

@3 days ago with 816 notes
diacrit:

hanesonly:

I almost forgot my briefcase!

it contains important lab results

diacrit:

hanesonly:

I almost forgot my briefcase!

it contains important lab results

(Source: awwww-cute, via moonlight69)

@3 days ago with 265968 notes
#pun life 

brianthuff:

Is there anything a natural 20 can’t do?

This is a poster idea I developed to show off the amazingness of tabletop rpgs.

1 - You trip and fall over a crack in the floor. Roll damage.

1 - You break both your legs. There is a bone poking out the side. Roll mental strength

20 - …You’re okay! You’re going to just power through!

(via knitmeapony)

@1 hour ago with 1046 notes
#true stories of nat 20 

knitmeapony:

suzie-guru:

familiaralien:

xtattooedheart:

birdologist:

I can’t even hear what this dude’s saying but look at how ineffectually angry this bird is.

I’ve had days where I’ve wanted ti shriek like this at people too.
As a side note, I love that barn owls are used to often in art, and considered the most beautiful species, yet they make a noise like Satan’s chalkboard.
Majestic.

So much for owls saying hoot :U

"Are we ready, little one?"

*SCREECH OF MURDEROUS RAGE*

I’ve got nothing but love for folks who call angry, screeching predators ‘little one’.

I feel a great kinship to this owl.

@22 hours ago with 31325 notes

on the ice bucket challenge

nofunphillips:

my dad died from ALS when i was 3 years old. he was 36. my mom was 33. that was 30 years ago. now i’m the same age my mom was when my dad died. and there is still no cure for ALS. 

this is what happens when you have ALS: your muscles slowly stop working, one part at a time. for my dad, first he couldn’t use one of his hands. then his arm. then the other arm. then he couldn’t walk. then he couldn’t stand up. then he couldn’t talk. then he couldn’t swallow. then he couldn’t breathe. then he was dead.

this all took about two years. he was diagnosed when i was about one year old. the only memories i have about my dad are of an inert body in a wheelchair or lying in a bed with a bunch of tubes stuck into it. as i was learning to talk, he was losing the ability to speak. as i was learning to walk, he stopped being able to move. my mom often had to choose between who she was going to help go to the bathroom at any given moment: her husband or her toddler.

after my dad died, my mom took over the philadelphia chapter of the ALS association. it consisted of a shoebox full of notecards with names on it. now it is a multi-million dollar organization with a large staff. she is still in charge. my mom is one of the most amazing people on the planet, basically.

these past couple weeks have been mind-boggling. i have openly wept watching so many of these videos. i still don’t completely get how all of this has happened, but now we live in a world in which lil wayne and taylor swift and oprah and justin timberlake and weird al and bill gates talk about ALS. my mom just emailed me this sentence: “lebron james ice bucket challenge.” i mean, IS THIS REAL LIFE?! i just keep saying over and over: holy shit. holy shit. holy shit.

so far, it has raised over 10 million dollars… and counting. my mom has spent every single day of her life for the past three decades trying to get this kind of attention and funds for this disease.

i don’t care if it’s a stupid gimmick. i don’t care if people are just doing this because it’s trendy or because they want pats on the back. i don’t care if it’s the new harlem shake. i don’t care if for the rest of my life, when i talk about ALS, i have to say “you know, the ice bucket disease.”

please, everybody, please keep pouring buckets of ice over your heads. please keep donating money. please keep talking about this.

my mom’s chapter:

http://www.alsphiladelphia.org/ 

(via theladymarvel)

@1 day ago with 35826 notes

"[I]t is actually more expensive to be poor than not poor. If you can’t afford the first month’s rent and security deposit you need in order to rent an apartment, you may get stuck in an overpriced residential motel. If you don’t have a kitchen or even a refrigerator and microwave, you will find yourself falling back on convenience store food, which—in addition to its nutritional deficits—is also alarmingly overpriced. If you need a loan, as most poor people eventually do, you will end up paying an interest rate many times more than what a more affluent borrower would be charged. To be poor—especially with children to support and care for—is a perpetual high-wire act."

It Is Expensive to Be Poor | The Atlantic  (via america-wakiewakie)

Reblog this forever. I’ll never forget how many of my students in the school I worked in with a 100% free and reduced lunch rate lived in residential motels and how many of them relied on the school to get breakfast and lunch and how often those were their only meals for the day.

Or how my friends who have older cars have to spend so much money repairing them but an older car was all they could afford in the first place.

And how you literally have no safety net because if you already fixed one thing on your car and something else goes a week later, you’ve already spent the little bit of buffer you saved up.

(via raindropprincess)

“The reason that the rich were so rich, Vimes reasoned, was because they managed to spend less money.

Take boots, for example. He earned thirty-eight dollars a month plus allowances. A really good pair of leather boots cost fifty dollars. But an affordable pair of boots, which were sort of OK for a season or two and then leaked like hell when the cardboard gave out, cost about ten dollars. Those were the kind of boots Vimes always bought, and wore until the soles were so thin that he could tell where he was in Ankh-Morpork on a foggy night by the feel of the cobbles.

But the thing was that good boots lasted for years and years. A man who could afford fifty dollars had a pair of boots that’d still be keeping his feet dry in ten years’ time, while the poor man who could only afford cheap boots would have spent a hundred dollars on boots in the same time and would still have wet feet.

This was the Captain Samuel Vimes ‘Boots’ theory of socioeconomic unfairness.”

(via complicatedtriangulated)

(via teenargh)

@3 days ago with 14718 notes
#it is expensive to be poor 
theorlandojones:

As we wrap up this terrible week and weekend some final thoughts before I get my black ass back to work tomorrow to fight fictional demons instead of feeling powerless against the real ones —
Although he wasn’t by any means a close personal friend, the death of Robin Williams affected by greatly. Working with him and David Duchovny on the film House of D was a privilege and seeing how he treated everyone he encountered regardless of race, class, gender or orientation remains a hopeful reminder that genuine kindness and empathy does exist in the world. Whatever the ultimate reasons for his decision to take his own life I pray for him, his family and all who suffer from the unrelenting grasp of depression and substance abuse. By shining his light on us all for the period of time he did, I am 100% certain that Robin left this world a better place than he entered it with a legacy that will not soon be forgotten.
That said, if we spent even a fraction of the time given to the tributes about Robin and the late Lauren Bacall also remembering the lives of Michael Brown, Eric Garner, John Crawford, Ezell Ford or Dante Parker (the 5 unarmed black men killed by police just in the past month) or honestly looked at the data about how often police shoot unarmed black men and women in this country we would all hang our collective heads in shame.
In the midst of thousands upon thousands of peaceful protesters who came out demanding answers and marching for justice with the powerful and heartbreaking refrain Hands Up. Don’t Shoot. the actions of a small few in Ferguson (many of whom were anarchists that intentionally came into the city to stir up trouble and perhaps a few others from the community who had simply reached their breaking point in the face of racial, economic and social injustice) gave the white power structure the cover to quickly change the narrative to one about the violence in the city (in reality almost entirely perpetrated by the militarized police rather than the demonstrators) instead of the murder of an unarmed teenager by a cop who “never meant for this to happen" (and don’t even get me started on that fuckery which should instead read "a cop who never meant to be held accountable").
In this way, a PROTEST became a RIOT. Images of demonstrators THROWING BACK tear gas canisters launched at them became stories of rioters throwing molotov cocktails AT THE POLICE (and yes I am aware of media reports showing that molotov cocktails were in fact used by protesters in some instances but not in the way that it was ultimately spun). And the police released incendiary and ENTIRELY IRRELEVANT information about Michael Brown that the media lapped up because it reinforced the all too familiar trope that “the violent black dude was a thug who got what he deserved”.
Black victims are regularly eyed with suspicion and contempt (and ultimately deemed responsible for what happened to them) while the media too often generates headlines that exhibit an air of disbelief at an alleged white killer’s supposed actions.
Even in our outrage at what happened at this week and the necessity for our voices to be heard so this story is not swept under the rug, we all know something like this will happen again. And again. And again.
Until each of us (black, white, brown, etc) demands accountability from our elected officials we will get the country we deserve. Tweeting is not enough. Feeling bad is not enough. Acting like we’re overreacting and it can’t really be that bad makes you an accessory after the fact (not to mention an asshole). 
Which is why, as the GIF above shows, I’m giving America a down vote.
So how can we stop feeling powerless? What can we actually do?
Honestly, there are people much smarter than me who can do a better job of answering that question.
But trying to answer that question for myself is a large part of why I do what I do for a living. Because representation matters. Because being in control of our own stories empowers us to show a wide range of depictions of blackness and “otherness” (shockingly, not only do we not all LOOK ALIKE but we also don’t all THINK ALIKE) that are far more interesting than what we’ve been spoon fed in the past. I’m the first to admit that we’ve still got A LONG WAY TO GO and that’s where you all come in.
Although my engagement in fandom is embraced by some and side-eyed by others, these spaces of interaction may in fact play one of the most significant roles in the future of media and representation as we know it. At the very least it will create a future generation of professional storytellers (and social justice advocates) who were raised in the trenches of Live Journal, Tumblr, ao3 and other platforms currently in use or yet to be created.
I know this is your turf and even though there are times some of you wish I’d go away I genuinely appreciate the opportunity to interact with you here.
Together, we can make a difference.
Trollando out.

theorlandojones:

As we wrap up this terrible week and weekend some final thoughts before I get my black ass back to work tomorrow to fight fictional demons instead of feeling powerless against the real ones —

Although he wasn’t by any means a close personal friend, the death of Robin Williams affected by greatly. Working with him and David Duchovny on the film House of D was a privilege and seeing how he treated everyone he encountered regardless of race, class, gender or orientation remains a hopeful reminder that genuine kindness and empathy does exist in the world. Whatever the ultimate reasons for his decision to take his own life I pray for him, his family and all who suffer from the unrelenting grasp of depression and substance abuse. By shining his light on us all for the period of time he did, I am 100% certain that Robin left this world a better place than he entered it with a legacy that will not soon be forgotten.

That said, if we spent even a fraction of the time given to the tributes about Robin and the late Lauren Bacall also remembering the lives of Michael Brown, Eric Garner, John Crawford, Ezell Ford or Dante Parker (the 5 unarmed black men killed by police just in the past month) or honestly looked at the data about how often police shoot unarmed black men and women in this country we would all hang our collective heads in shame.

In the midst of thousands upon thousands of peaceful protesters who came out demanding answers and marching for justice with the powerful and heartbreaking refrain Hands Up. Don’t Shoot. the actions of a small few in Ferguson (many of whom were anarchists that intentionally came into the city to stir up trouble and perhaps a few others from the community who had simply reached their breaking point in the face of racial, economic and social injustice) gave the white power structure the cover to quickly change the narrative to one about the violence in the city (in reality almost entirely perpetrated by the militarized police rather than the demonstrators) instead of the murder of an unarmed teenager by a cop who “never meant for this to happen" (and don’t even get me started on that fuckery which should instead read "a cop who never meant to be held accountable").

In this way, a PROTEST became a RIOT. Images of demonstrators THROWING BACK tear gas canisters launched at them became stories of rioters throwing molotov cocktails AT THE POLICE (and yes I am aware of media reports showing that molotov cocktails were in fact used by protesters in some instances but not in the way that it was ultimately spun). And the police released incendiary and ENTIRELY IRRELEVANT information about Michael Brown that the media lapped up because it reinforced the all too familiar trope that “the violent black dude was a thug who got what he deserved”.

Black victims are regularly eyed with suspicion and contempt (and ultimately deemed responsible for what happened to them) while the media too often generates headlines that exhibit an air of disbelief at an alleged white killer’s supposed actions.

Even in our outrage at what happened at this week and the necessity for our voices to be heard so this story is not swept under the rug, we all know something like this will happen again. And again. And again.

Until each of us (black, white, brown, etc) demands accountability from our elected officials we will get the country we deserve. Tweeting is not enough. Feeling bad is not enough. Acting like we’re overreacting and it can’t really be that bad makes you an accessory after the fact (not to mention an asshole). 

Which is why, as the GIF above shows, I’m giving America a down vote.

So how can we stop feeling powerless? What can we actually do?

Honestly, there are people much smarter than me who can do a better job of answering that question.

But trying to answer that question for myself is a large part of why I do what I do for a living. Because representation matters. Because being in control of our own stories empowers us to show a wide range of depictions of blackness and “otherness” (shockingly, not only do we not all LOOK ALIKE but we also don’t all THINK ALIKE) that are far more interesting than what we’ve been spoon fed in the past. I’m the first to admit that we’ve still got A LONG WAY TO GO and that’s where you all come in.

Although my engagement in fandom is embraced by some and side-eyed by others, these spaces of interaction may in fact play one of the most significant roles in the future of media and representation as we know it. At the very least it will create a future generation of professional storytellers (and social justice advocates) who were raised in the trenches of Live Journal, Tumblr, ao3 and other platforms currently in use or yet to be created.

I know this is your turf and even though there are times some of you wish I’d go away I genuinely appreciate the opportunity to interact with you here.

Together, we can make a difference.

Trollando out.

(via seraangel)

@3 days ago with 5568 notes
#ferguson #orlando jones