boldmatter:

nadapoet:

boldmatter:

nadapoet:

boldmatter:

lenofi:

if you’ll notice, i tried to cleanse my mind of dirty carey price cowboy manifest destiny and the open range thoughts with precious baby skinner…but then i imagine those goalie haunches tightly gripping the pulsing back of a stallion in mid-gallop coming towards me in the waning sunlight as i wait by a wooden fencepost by the homestead…

by the way, it’s 1856. and i’m ready to do the nasty with my cowboy.

Just FYI: if you’re talking about Carey Price, do yourself a favor and never, EVER mention Manifest Destiny in a positive way! Also, in 1856, Carey Price probs wouldn’t have been considered a person in most of North America, so

I think Lauren can use Carey Price in anyway she sees fit because there was no intentional racial comment. Your assertions over Manifest Destiny are problematic because you positively reap the benefits of the effects of Manifest Destiny while at the same time denouncing it as reprehensible. Not to tease you or anything, but you state you enjoy entities that are a result of Manifest Destiny, specifically establishments in territories acquired for the specific purpose of continental expansion. I speak particularly of LA and, as an establishment of LA, the Dodgers. LA went from Spanish rule to American rule with the rest of California in order for the country to gain a foothold on the pacific seaboard for the specific purpose of obtaining the rest of what is now the continental US. Therefore, LA, in its prominence as a US city, is a US city because it fell within the confines of Manifest Destiny. The fact that you enjoy an establishment from the city shows that you are viewing Manifest Destiny (or at least its effects) in a positive way. Thus, that would make you as racist as you claim Lauren is. 

But, is liking the Dodgers or anything from LA really racist? No, not unless you develop a contradictory set of standards by which you judge people. So, you judge Lauren as being racist because she made some remark alluding to Carey Price and Manifest Destiny. You assert that since Price has an ethnic background of First Nations (Not Native American as Price is not a US citizen. Theoretically, your assertion of Manifest Destiny should not even really apply since Price is Canadian and the notion is not Canadian, but I will leave you to resolve that), he should not be lumped in with allusions of early to mid 19th century imagery. Your assertion falls flat and places you within a hypocritical light because

  1. Lauren was be fantastical, not racist, and aiming for humor.
  2. You did not get the humor and were offended by its supposed racist overtones.
  3. You develop an avenue of logic to judge Lauren and her statements.
  4. You actually develop a paradox in which you yourself become entangled.

The actions of certain peoples and even ideals of Manifest Destiny are problematic when viewed in certain lights. However, the benefits for Americans, especially white Americans, are still noticeable today. One does not have to like or agree with that was done in the 19th century (I thought this was well understand by most thinking individuals). However, when one uses history to judge someone in the present, that person (specifically you) tends to fall into a rhetorical trap of their own making.

6. And most importantly, it doesn’t matter if someone’s intent is to be racist. It amazes me how often people will try and say “well it wasn’t my intention” when talking about something being racist. And it doesn’t really matter if you intend to be racist, what matters is whether what you say or do IS racist. And it’s not a huge deal, it isn’t going to kill someone, but I don’t particularly like when I encounter people erasing Carey Price’s heritage and I feel like I encounter it in hockey fandom a lot, so I said something. It’s as much if not more for the people that follow me, because I try to make it clear that I don’t like that sort of thing.

You keep on keeping on!

I’m just going to reply to the sixth comment because the rest are either generalizations of my points, words being put in my mouth, or your own personal feelings (which you are entitled to, obviously). 

What you could have done, instead of being condescending and somewhat rude, is say…”Hey, this might be misconstrued as racist because Carey Price has an ethnic background of groups A, B, and C.” What you did was call Lauren racist, or implied she was racist, based on some little post, assuming she meant something more sinister than she really did. Obviously, she didn’t know he had native ancestry. You took a moment to educate and completely removed it in order to, I guess, fulfill some urge to be better than her because you know more about Carey Price. 

First off, I don’t like it when people make a discussion of racism or any sort of social justice issue into one of tone, because I don’t particularly like the notion of “if you were just NICER about this, maybe I’d be less of a racist/sexist/homophobe/etc.”. Sorry, I wasn’t aware that it was my responsibility to tell someone to be less racist and say it with a smile. I have never liked that sort of thing.

Secondly, I didn’t call that girl racist, I said she said something racist, which is different. Because I don’t know her, all I can do is judge her by what she said. One of the things that makes having any sort of conversation about racism or mentioning that something someone did was racist is that everyone interprets that as calling them racist. It’s possible the person who said that is racist, it’s possible she just hadn’t thought about it and said something racist on accident. Both are equally likely and my pointing out that something she said was racist isn’t a value judgement on her. I didn’t say she was a dirty racist, I said she said a racist thing. If we’re being prescriptive about how we’d like people to interact in conversations like these, I’d like for people’s first reaction to the suggestion that they might have said/done something racist to be “did I? How was it offensive?” and a conversation rather than “HOW DARE YOU SAY SOMETHING SO HEINOUS ABOUT ME!” and some pearl clutching.

And again, this wasn’t even mostly directed at her, it was directed at the people who follow me on tumblr. One of the weird things about following strangers on tumblr is that I never know when/if they’re gonna say something hella racist out of seemingly nowhere. So the reason I reblogged the post was that I’d seen people ignore/erase his heritage before and wanted to remind everyone that it wasn’t cool to do. It wasn’t personal, I would have done the same thing to any post I saw that I found problematic

In which Katarin is a sexy beast.

@2 years ago with 19 notes
#everyone's a little bit racist #good people can say racist shit #what makes them good is when they acknowledge and try to correct it. 

boldmatter:

nadapoet:

boldmatter:

nadapoet:

boldmatter:

lenofi:

if you’ll notice, i tried to cleanse my mind of dirty carey price cowboy manifest destiny and the open range thoughts with precious baby skinner…but then i imagine those goalie haunches tightly gripping the pulsing back of a stallion in mid-gallop coming towards me in the waning sunlight as i wait by a wooden fencepost by the homestead…

by the way, it’s 1856. and i’m ready to do the nasty with my cowboy.

Just FYI: if you’re talking about Carey Price, do yourself a favor and never, EVER mention Manifest Destiny in a positive way! Also, in 1856, Carey Price probs wouldn’t have been considered a person in most of North America, so

I think Lauren can use Carey Price in anyway she sees fit because there was no intentional racial comment. Your assertions over Manifest Destiny are problematic because you positively reap the benefits of the effects of Manifest Destiny while at the same time denouncing it as reprehensible. Not to tease you or anything, but you state you enjoy entities that are a result of Manifest Destiny, specifically establishments in territories acquired for the specific purpose of continental expansion. I speak particularly of LA and, as an establishment of LA, the Dodgers. LA went from Spanish rule to American rule with the rest of California in order for the country to gain a foothold on the pacific seaboard for the specific purpose of obtaining the rest of what is now the continental US. Therefore, LA, in its prominence as a US city, is a US city because it fell within the confines of Manifest Destiny. The fact that you enjoy an establishment from the city shows that you are viewing Manifest Destiny (or at least its effects) in a positive way. Thus, that would make you as racist as you claim Lauren is. 

But, is liking the Dodgers or anything from LA really racist? No, not unless you develop a contradictory set of standards by which you judge people. So, you judge Lauren as being racist because she made some remark alluding to Carey Price and Manifest Destiny. You assert that since Price has an ethnic background of First Nations (Not Native American as Price is not a US citizen. Theoretically, your assertion of Manifest Destiny should not even really apply since Price is Canadian and the notion is not Canadian, but I will leave you to resolve that), he should not be lumped in with allusions of early to mid 19th century imagery. Your assertion falls flat and places you within a hypocritical light because

  1. Lauren was be fantastical, not racist, and aiming for humor.
  2. You did not get the humor and were offended by its supposed racist overtones.
  3. You develop an avenue of logic to judge Lauren and her statements.
  4. You actually develop a paradox in which you yourself become entangled.

The actions of certain peoples and even ideals of Manifest Destiny are problematic when viewed in certain lights. However, the benefits for Americans, especially white Americans, are still noticeable today. One does not have to like or agree with that was done in the 19th century (I thought this was well understand by most thinking individuals). However, when one uses history to judge someone in the present, that person (specifically you) tends to fall into a rhetorical trap of their own making.

6. And most importantly, it doesn’t matter if someone’s intent is to be racist. It amazes me how often people will try and say “well it wasn’t my intention” when talking about something being racist. And it doesn’t really matter if you intend to be racist, what matters is whether what you say or do IS racist. And it’s not a huge deal, it isn’t going to kill someone, but I don’t particularly like when I encounter people erasing Carey Price’s heritage and I feel like I encounter it in hockey fandom a lot, so I said something. It’s as much if not more for the people that follow me, because I try to make it clear that I don’t like that sort of thing.

You keep on keeping on!

I’m just going to reply to the sixth comment because the rest are either generalizations of my points, words being put in my mouth, or your own personal feelings (which you are entitled to, obviously). 

What you could have done, instead of being condescending and somewhat rude, is say…”Hey, this might be misconstrued as racist because Carey Price has an ethnic background of groups A, B, and C.” What you did was call Lauren racist, or implied she was racist, based on some little post, assuming she meant something more sinister than she really did. Obviously, she didn’t know he had native ancestry. You took a moment to educate and completely removed it in order to, I guess, fulfill some urge to be better than her because you know more about Carey Price. 

First off, I don’t like it when people make a discussion of racism or any sort of social justice issue into one of tone, because I don’t particularly like the notion of “if you were just NICER about this, maybe I’d be less of a racist/sexist/homophobe/etc.”. Sorry, I wasn’t aware that it was my responsibility to tell someone to be less racist and say it with a smile. I have never liked that sort of thing.

Secondly, I didn’t call that girl racist, I said she said something racist, which is different. Because I don’t know her, all I can do is judge her by what she said. One of the things that makes having any sort of conversation about racism or mentioning that something someone did was racist is that everyone interprets that as calling them racist. It’s possible the person who said that is racist, it’s possible she just hadn’t thought about it and said something racist on accident. Both are equally likely and my pointing out that something she said was racist isn’t a value judgement on her. I didn’t say she was a dirty racist, I said she said a racist thing. If we’re being prescriptive about how we’d like people to interact in conversations like these, I’d like for people’s first reaction to the suggestion that they might have said/done something racist to be “did I? How was it offensive?” and a conversation rather than “HOW DARE YOU SAY SOMETHING SO HEINOUS ABOUT ME!” and some pearl clutching.

And again, this wasn’t even mostly directed at her, it was directed at the people who follow me on tumblr. One of the weird things about following strangers on tumblr is that I never know when/if they’re gonna say something hella racist out of seemingly nowhere. So the reason I reblogged the post was that I’d seen people ignore/erase his heritage before and wanted to remind everyone that it wasn’t cool to do. It wasn’t personal, I would have done the same thing to any post I saw that I found problematic

In which Katarin is a sexy beast.

2 years ago
#everyone's a little bit racist #good people can say racist shit #what makes them good is when they acknowledge and try to correct it.